Stainless Steel Wire Calculator

Products:

Ultra Fine Stainless Steel Wire
Stainless Steel Wire
Stainless Steel Cold Heading Wire
Stainless Steel EPQ Wire
Stainless Steel Machining Wire
Stainless Steel Forming Wire
Stainless Steel Spring Wire
Stainless Steel Cable Rope
Stainless Steel Alloys
FEP Coated Stainless Steel cable
Insulated Stainless Steel Single Wire

Types of Stainless Steel:

Stainless Steel Wire 302
Stainless Steel Wire 304
Stainless Steel Wire 310
Stainless Steel Wire 314
Stainless Steel Wire 316
Stainless Steel Wire 317
Stainless Steel Wire 321
Stainless Steel Wire 347
Stainless Steel Wire 410
Stainless Steel Wire 412
Stainless Steel Wire 420
Stainless Steel Wire 430
Stainless Steel Wire 434

Stainless Steel Technical Info:

Stainless Steel Wire Technical
Stainless Steel Wire Calculator
Stainless Steel Wire Composition Chart
Stainless Steel Alloy Ft/lb chart
Stainless Steel Alloy Comparsion Chart
Stainless Steel Wire Cross Reference Chart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                    

Ultra Fine Stainless Steel Wire

Features:

     Characterisitics:
          Excellent Straightness
          Uniform and beautiful surface condition
          Excellent coil-forming ability
          High elasticity and high fatigue resistance
          Strong corrosion resistance against exposure to the toughest atmosphere

     Physical Parameter:

          Wire Diameter: 0.035mm
          Diameter Tolerance: =/+ 0.001mm
          Overall Tolerance: =/<0.001mm
          Tensile Strength: 75-81 kgf/mm squared
          Elongation: =/> 25%

     Technical Parameter:

          
Wire 
Diameter
Standard Deviation
Tensile Strength
(Kgf/mm)
AWG
NOM
MM
(mm)
304L
304N1
316L
53
.00070
0.018
±0.001
100-110
95-105
75-81
52
.00078
0.020
50
.00099
0.025
48
.00123
0.030
47
.00140
0.035
46
.00157
0.040
 ±0.002
95-105
93-103
74-80
45
.00176
0.045
44
.0020
0.050
73-85
90-100
73-79
43
.0023
0.060
42
.0025
0.065
41
.0028
0.070
40
.0031
0.080
73-83
72-78
39
.0035
0.090
38
.0040
0.100
71-81
70-76


      Usage:

            Woven
            Textile static-resistant
            Radiation-proof habiliment


Ultra Fine Stainless Steel Technical Info

Chemical Composition of Stainless Steel 300 -400 Series

Stainless Steel 302

Stainless Steel 304 & 304L

Stainless Steel 316 & 316 L

Stainless Steel Alloy Comparsion Chart

Insulated Stainless Steel

Stainless Steel Rope/Cable

Tempers, Yields & Tensiles for Stainless Steel 302 - 347

Stainless Steel Feet per Pound Chart

Stainless Steel Hardness Conversion Chart

Rockwell C Hardness Austentic Steels Chart

Rockwell B Hardness for Non-Austentic Steels, Nickel, Brass and Copper

Rockwell C Hardness for Non-Austentic Steels, Nickel, Brass and Copper

Comparsion of Resistance between ETP Copper and Stainless Steel Grade 304 & 316

Stainless Steel Materials Safety Data Sheet

 


Stainless Steel Overview:

 Background
The "discovery" of stainless steel occurred between 1900 and 1915 time period, however; as with many discoveries it was the accumulated efforts of several individuals that actually began in 1821. That year a Frenchman named Berthier found that iron when alloyed with chromium was resistant to some acids. Others studied the effects of stainless steel, the chromium content needs to be at least 10.5%. In 1872, Messers, Woods and Clark applied for a British patent for what they identified as an acid and weather resistant alloy containing 30 to 35% chromium and 1.5 to 2& tungsten. Then, in 1875 another Frenchman named Brustlein recognized the importance of carbon levels in addition to chromium. Stainless steel needs to have a very low level of carbon at 0.15%. While many others investigated the chromium/iron composition, the difficulty in obtaining the low carbon levels persisted for many years until low carbon ferrochrome became commercially available.
 Discovery
In 1904, Leon Guillet published research on alloys with composition that today would be known as 410, 420, 442, 446 and 440-C. In 1906 he also published a detailed study of an iron-nickel-chromium alloy that is the basic metallurgical structure for the 300 series of stainless steel. In 1909 in England, Giesen published a lengthy account on the chromium-nickel (austenitic 300 series) stainless steels. Also in England and France, Portevin published studies on an alloy that today would be 430 stainless steel. In Germany, in 1908, Monnartz and Borchers found evidence of the relationship between a minimum level of chromium (10.5%) on corrosion resistance as well as the importance of low carbon content and the role of molybdenum in increasing corrosion resistance to chlorides.